Every March, college basketball teams across the country get ready to enter the 64 team, winner-takes-all scrum we call “March Madness.” By now, it’s ritual: Bosses and managers across the nation can expect right around four billion dollars in lost worker productivity, with employees filling out brackets, trash talking and talking shop on social media (63 million engagements in 2017, and that’s only tournament-specific handles), checking in on tournament progress online and otherwise giving in to the “madness.”


    It’s hard to believe, but kickoff for Super Bowl LII is this Sunday! While it’s been fun to get an advanced look at some of the ads that will play during the big game, here at 6AM we’re taking bets to see which brand ends up with the evening’s best and most surprising commercial.

  • Radio

    For an advertising medium that began in the 1920’s, radio has shown itself to be a resilient way to deliver brand messaging. But with the rise of digital advertising, many are questioning radio’s continued longevity. Web marketers will tell you it’s dying a slow death while radio marketers will tell you it’s never been more relevant.

    The truth? Well, it’s somewhere in the middle.

  • Nike, Just Do It

    Nike’s “Just do it.” American Express’s “Don’t leave home without it.” Looking around the corporate landscape can make you feel like a killer tagline is crucial to your brand.

  • Lynn Marolt

    From a very young age, Lynn was always striving to be seen as someone with a story to tell. As an identical twin, Lynn grew up understanding the importance of branding yourself to stand out from the pack. She decided to channel her passion for branding into a degree in advertising and marketing and has been helping others create and manage their image in the world ever since. All of that, of course, with her added twist of country music influence, red lipstick and Elvis impersonations. 


    I am a firm believer in taking the road less traveled.

    I spent the first 15 years of my career working all over the country as a commercial Interior Designer before transitioning into marketing and advertising. I spent much of my early career designing retail stores, which are all about creating a three-dimensional branded experience. A store is a physical representation of a brand and the products that brand sells, right? I learned a lot about branding.

  • Personas and media planning

    A few weeks ago, we discussed what personas are and how a business can use them to create a marketing strategy. Now, let’s take those concepts a bit further and see how personas can be used to buy advertising space and develop a media strategy.

  •  Healthcare technology

    As a healthcare marketing director/executive, I am sure you are bombarded with digital transformation solutions every day. You use, manage or integrate with CRMs, EMRs, PRMs, SEO/SEM, CMS, Google Analytics, etc. etc. Add them all together and they equal more patients and higher profitability, right? When integrated correctly this can happen. At the end of the day, without a clear strategy of what you hope to achieve, it’s just a bunch of technology sitting in silos.

  • Business personas

    Let’s say you’ve decided to start your own small business; you’ve been passionate about candles for a long time, and your new business is making and selling candles. As part of your business plan, you’ve found a workspace, purchased the supplies to get your first batch going, filed all necessary paperwork and even found a designer to design and print the labels for your candles. Next on the “to do” list is to get business cards printed and your own website launched. You’re feeling great about your plans, but a month later you’re struggling to find customers. What went wrong?